Tuesday, September 16, 2014

School Food Pt 2

Armstrong Technical High School, Washington, DC, 1942 (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Editor and Food Prof Frederick Douglass interviews Neal Sharter the innovative and progressive Food Director at the New Hampton School. Opie's forthcoming books are Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black and Latino Coalitions in New York From Protest to Public Office and The Culinary World of Zora Neale Hurston. 

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Back To School Series: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Back+to+School+Series

Monday, September 15, 2014

School Food Pt 1

Charlotte County, Virginia School Cafeteria, 1943, (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Editor and Food Prof Fred Opie interviews Neal Shartar the innovative and progressive Food Director at the New Hampton School. Opie's forthcoming books are Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black and Latino Coalitions in New York From Protest to Public Office and The Culinary World of Zora Neale Hurston. 

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Back To School Series: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Back+to+School+Series


REAL People Making A Difference: Neal Shartar [Watch Now 7 min 55 sec]

Friday, September 12, 2014

Food and Religion in 17th Brazil

Moqueca (fish stew), rice, and manioc meal, recipe below
As part of our series on food and religion, let's travel to South America today. In many parts of the Americas, religious culinary traditions have meant that people eat fish on Fridays. This had been the case in colonial Brazil which the Portuguese first controlled followed by a short period in which the Dutch invaded and held part of their holdings. the Between 1640 and 1649, the Dutch controlled Portugal’s African settlements and its most important sugar producing region in southern Brazil. Johan Nieuhoff worked for the Dutch East Indies and Dutch West Indies Companies spending nine years in Brazil. “The most universal food of the Brazilians,” is manioc or cassava meal, he writes in the 1640s. He adds they also feast upon seasoned crabs and craw-fish either boiled or roasted. “Small fish” they wrap and cook in banana leaves. 

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Food and Religion Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Food+and+Religion+


Fish Series with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=For+Those+Who+Love+To+Fish+and+Eat+Fish+Part+

Bahian Crab Meat in a shell recipe: http://www.maria-brazil.org/casquinha_de_siri.htm

Moqueca Bahian fish stew recipe: http://events.nytimes.com/recipes/12100/1990/09/26/Moqueca-Bahian-fish-stew/recipe.html

PBS Documentary, Race in Brazil: [Watch 51 min 25 sec] http://www.pbs.org/wnet/black-in-latin-america/featured/black-in-latin-america-full-episode-brazil-a-racial-paradise/224/

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Food and Religion in the Depression Era South

A slice of sweet potato pie, this and other recipes below

As part of our food and religion series let's turn to North Carolina and the interview done artist and educator Dr. David Driskell. Driskell was born in 1931 and grew up in the Foote Hill, Blue Ridge region of the Appalachian Mountains in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He says that in Rutherford County blacks and whites lived “side by side, our property was continues with [whites]. . . it was something you don’t hear written about or talked about. But everybody had to be depended on each other.” Did black and white churches eat differently at their events? “I don’t think we were eating differently, I think we were eating the same thing [from our gardens] . . . sweet potatoes, sweet potato pie, greens, white potatoes, potato salad all those kind of things. . . . I suspect we had some dishes that they didn’t have without our aid. Very seldom did I know of them making sweet potato pie and things like that, they would get someone to come in and do it for them. . . My mother would often go up and cook things for [our white neighbors] the Elliots . . .  as a way of making money [preparing] a pie, cake, or fried chicken.” 

Sweet Potato Pie Recipe
(Makes 9 inch pie)

 Ingredients
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 cup mashed sweet potatoes
3 eggs
1 1/4 cups milk
3 tablespoons orange juice
3/4 teaspoon grated orange rind
1/4 cup butter, melted and cooled

Directions
Mix sugar, salt, and spices. Add to sweet potatoes. Add beaten eggs, milk, orange juice, grated orange rind, and butter. Pour into unbaked pastry shell bake in hot oven for 10 min. Reduce heat to moderate and finish baking at between 350° to 435.°
New Journal and Guide, December 18, 1937

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Food and Religion Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Food+and+Religion+

Pie Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=%22Pie%22

Cakes Stories with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=cake

Fried Chicken Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Fried+Chicken

More Interviews with David Driskell with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=David+Driskell

About David Driskell: http://www.visionaryproject.com/driskelldavid/

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Race, Class, and Food in 1940s Lowcountry South Carolina

Shrimp and Buttermilk Biscuits, recipe below (Shrimp image from Pinterest)
In doing research for the book Hog and Hominy, a came across a 1940s primary source that provides insights into race and class and the use of shrimp among whites and blacks in low country south Carolina. During the summer white families ate shrimp dishes like “fried shrimp” for breakfast, and shrimp and stew for dinner. For African Americans, shrimp appeared only one time, and it was on a fall menu as the breakfast dish “shrimp and gravy.” Side dishes common to black and white southern cooks included corn bread, baked sweet potatoes, turnips, and biscuits. The recipe below comes from the Chicago Defender. Chicago had been an important destination for southern migrants starting around the time of World War I as folks came to fill factory jobs in the windy city.


Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe

Ingredients
2 cups good buttermilk
1 mixing spoon of cream
2 teaspoons of soda
2 teaspoons of cream of tartar
A good pinch of salt
Flour (suggested amount below)

Method
Dissolve soda and cream of tartar in milk thoroughly or else sift with flour as preferred.
Add the first five ingredients with enough flour to make stiff. Roll out the dough and cut.

Bake in a quick oven. (Genevieve Whimp, The Chicago Defender, March 30, 1918.)

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Eating From Your Garden Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Eating+From+Your+Garden+This+Fall

South Carolina Foodways and Recipes Including Shrimp: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=South+Carolina+Foodways

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Eating Squash, Pumpkins, and Zucchini From Your Garden

Pumpkin bread,recipes below (from  http://my miscellaniblogspot.com)
As part of my ongoing series on the fall harvest, we turned to Native American contribution to global cookery—squash,  pumpkins and and zucchini.  Archaeologist point to Mesoamerica as the origins of the largest concentration of these plants in the world. We know that the Maya ate large numbers of squash seeds alone, toasted, grounded, with Chile, and in corn-based drinks, and stews. The survival of Native Americans across the continent depended in large part on the successful cultivation of beans, corn, and squash. Native Americans introduced squash to Europeans and Africans when they arrived in the Americas. The word squash is a Native American term that became part of European languages in Americas such as Spanish, English, and Dutch. Below are some related recipes for your enjoyment.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Pumpkin Bread Recipe: http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/pumpkin_bread/

Squash and Zucchini Recipes:

Monday, September 8, 2014

Eating Eggplant From Your Garden This Fall

Egg plant parm (Parmagian), recipes below
So what to do with all that eggplant growing in your garden this fall?I learned how to cook some wonderful egg plant parm from my college lacrosse teammate Chris Acerno from Manhasset High School on Long Island. At the time, Herkimer County Community College had no dorms thus we all lived in apartments and cooked for ourselves. I’d visit Chris and find him making Italian gravy from scratch. He’d sauté crushed garlic in imported extra virgin olive oil, a dash of salt and freshly ground black pepper, oregano, and sage. Then he would add a can of imported crushed tomatoes—that how I still make my sauce today. Chris made excellent egg plant parm dipping thinly sliced egg plant in an egg batter. He’d then run it through imported Italian bread crumbs and then sauté the breaded egg plant in virgin olive oil and crushed garlic. When they were golden brown he’d take them out the skillet and put them on a plate. Next he’d carefully sprinkle graded Parmagian cheese on them like an artist and let them cool off a bit. Chris would serve up the crispy egg plant with his home made gravy over them and a side of pasta. That Italian could cook!

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Eating from Your Garden Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Eating+From+Your+Garden+This+Fall

Friday, September 5, 2014

Street Venders, Guadalajara, Mexico

Spicy roasted fava beans with chili powder and lemon   
As part of our ongoing series on street venders lets turn to Guadalajara, Mexico where I lived as a graduate student to study Spanish in the early 1990s. Street venders in Guadalajara, Mexico's second largest city, sold candies, nuts, and roasted beans smothered in salt, chili powder, and lime, as snacks. Over time I adapted to the language and the cuisine and developed a craving for hot and spicy flavors that I once could not handle. Overtime roasted spicy habas (fava beans) became my favorite street food. I liken them to southern boiled peanuts or roasted chestnuts that one would buy on the streets of Charleston or  New York City. Fava beans came to the Americas from the Mediterranean during the Iberian colonial period. I bought two or three paper or plastic bags full of the crunchy and spicy hot snacks several times a week on city streets. If you have a Latin American owned bodega near you, they will most likely sell them near the bags of plantain chips. 


Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Street Venders Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Street+Venders


Spicy Hot Food Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Spicy+Hot+Food+Series

Fava Bean Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Fava+beans

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Food and Religion, Mobile Alabama

Cajun Mobile Alabama Grillades and Grits, recipe below
After settling the question with his bacon and cabbage, the next dearest thing to a colored man, in the South, is his religion. I call it a ‘thing,’ because they always speak of getting religion as if they were going to market for it. —William Wells Brown, 1880

African-American religion historically nourished the soul, just as food nourished the body. This is primarily based on the evidence that religious traditions and eating on special occasions became even more established in African-American communities after emancipation. There are many different churches within most African-American communities but the food celebrations remain consistent. These events increased the association between soul and food in black communities. African Americans at the turn of the twentieth century were largely an agricultural group made up of hard-working farmers and farmhands. Thus, working off a heavy breakfast, lunch or dinner was much easier than in the industrial society of the late twentieth century. 

Cajun Mobile Alabama Grillades and Grits Recipe
Ingredients
2 lbs. round steak (or vegan steak substitute) cut into 2-inch strips
2 tsp. salt, divided
1/2 tsp. ground pepper, divided
1/2 Cup all-purpose flour
1/2 Cup vegetable oil, divided
2 Cups chopped Vidalia onion
1 Cup chopped green bell pepper
1 Cup chopped celery
1/4 tsp. ground ancho chili pepper
2 Cups canned diced tomatoes
1 tb. Chopped fresh chopped garlic
5 whole bay leaves
1/4 tsp. thyme
1/4 tsp. oregano
1/4 tsp. basil
2 Cups beef stock (or vegetable stock)
1/2 Cup dry red wine or 1/4 Cup red wine vinegar
2 TB. finely chopped, fresh parsley
Grits
2 Cups water
11/4 Cups milk (or soy milk)
1 tsp. salt
1 Cup quick-cooking grits
1/4 Cup butter (butter substitute)

Method
Place the meat strips in a bowl. Add 1 tsp. of the salt and 1/4 tsp. of the pepper and toss to coat. Add the flour and toss again to evenly coat the meat. In a large stock pot, heat 1/4 cup of the oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add the meat, in batches if necessary, and brown evenly on both sides, about 5-6 minutes. Remove the meat to paper towel-lined plates to drain. Add more oil to the pan as needed while browning the meat, making sure to let the oil get hot before adding the meat. Once all the meat has been browned, add the onion, bell pepper and celery to the pot along with 1/2 tsp. of the salt and the ancho peppers. Cook, stirring constantly, scrap the bottom of the pot to loosen any browned bits. Cook until the vegetables are softened, approximately 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and garlic. Cook, stirring often, for about 3 minutes. Add the bay leaves, thyme, oregano, basil, beef (or vegetable stock) wine and chopped garlic. Return the browned meat to the pot and season with the remaining salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer, cover, and reduce the heat to low. Cook for about 2 hours, stirring occasionally, or until the meat is tender. Remove the bay leaves before serving and stir in the parsley. Serve over grits (cook the grits like cream of wheat). Stir in the butter before serving and season with hot sauce if you like. Grillades is also wonderful served with rice.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Food and Religion Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Food+and+Religion+