Friday, July 31, 2015

Stone Fruit and the Great Depression

Making pies circa 1940 (Courtesy of State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)

Stone fruit are in season now and I've been enjoying some incredibly sweet and juicy peaches and nectarines. They remind me of a story dating back to the Great Depression era (1928-1941). Some folks went through the Depression without the need for government relief. One was civil rights leader Ralph David Abernathy, who recalled his childhood as the son of a farmer in Marengo County, Alabama, about ninety miles southwest of Montgomery. The family farm had peach and plum orchards as well as "pears, figs, and apples” chickens, pigs, and plenty of other foods that ended up on the family table. Abernathy recalls, “Everything I learned about the Great Depression was from a college textbook.” 

Peach Cobbler Recipe

Ingredients
2 cups peeled sliced peaches
1/2 Cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1 1/2 teaspoons flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons water
Piecrust

Instructions
Butter a deep pie pan and put the combined ingredients (except the crust) into the pan. Top with about 2 tablespoons of butter. Roll the piecrust to 1/4 inch thick and prick it. Cover the fruit and around the edge of the dish. Bake for 30 min in a hot oven at 450° and then for 10 min more at 325°.

The Pittsburgh Courier, August 30, 1941

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Alabama Food History and Stories: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Alabama

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Stumping and Eating in North Carolina

Political dinner in Monticello, Florida, circa 1930 (Courtesy of State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)
 
Food Prof Fred Opie talks with Yale Professor of History and North Carolina native Glenda Gilmore for his series Stumping and Eating, the role of food in political elections. Gilmore recalls the political culture of Gilford County where she grow up in the counties rich history of barbecues fish fries, and supper clubs. 

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Related Links:


North Carolina Food and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=North+Carolina

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

The Politics of Food on the Campaign Trail

Govenor Jeb Bush, lower right, serving paella, too on the campaign trail   
(Courtesy of State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)
Splendid Table Host Lynne Rossetto Kasper talks with Food Prof Fred Opie about the role of food in electoral politics. It part of his on going blog series Stumping and Eating. Dating back to the eighteenth century English politicians plied the most eligible voters in their districts with whisky and food.
[Listen Now 4min 53sec] http://fdopie.podomatic.com/entry/2014-11-21T11_48_06-08_00

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie


Florida Food Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Florida

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Cooking Is Like Playing Jazz

Musicians performing Jazz in Tom's Tavern club, Pensacola, Florida, 1956   
(Courtesy of State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)
An excerpt from a lecture Food prof Fred Opie gave at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey as part of the IAS’s Culture & Cuisine Series which feature speakers on a wide variety of food-related topics. The Original Title of was, "African Foodways Are Like Jazz: Culinary Improvisations in Africa and America," April 2011.
[Listen Now 11min] 12sec http://fdopie.podomatic.com/entry/2014-12-01T14_58_42-08_00
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Related Links:


Jazz and Food Stories with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Jazz 

Florida Food Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Florida

Fred Opie's New Books
     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Monday, July 27, 2015

Stadium Food in Candlestick Park and The Oakland Coliseum

Courtesy of the Library of Congress 
Host Fred Opie interviews San Francisco native Charles Ellis who reflects on his experience as a food vendor at the old Candlestick Park and Oakland Coliseum for Harry M. Stevens Inc. Ellis worked part-time as a food vendor from ninth-grade until his junior year in college. He provides an insiders history of stadium food concessions, traditions, and cultures, including descriptions of the hawkers, the industry, food, chefs, managers, and fans. [Listen Now 23m 50sec] http://fdopie.podomatic.com/entry/2015-05-14T12_28_42-07_00

Friday, July 24, 2015

Ice Cream Cones

(Photo from http://www.agilitynut.com/eateries/carvel.html)
One of my dads favorite finger foods was an ice cream cone.  Our family would load into the Rambler station wagon and head north to the base of Bear Mountain just outside of Peekskill to buy “custard.” This was the late 1960s early 1970s. On a hot summer evening there would be a line jutting out from the serving window of the ice cream stand. The stand offered vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, or twist with all three flavors. One could order a large or small cone with or without a topping. When I close my eyes now I can see my brothers and I at 6, 7, and 12 furiously licking the ice cream cones covered in chocolate or multi-colored sprinkles. Nobody talked we just licked  trying to stay ahead of the ice cream dripping from the cone onto our little brown fingers.

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My Dad’s Food Memories & Recipes:
 http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Fred+Opie+Jr

Finger Food Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Finger+Food

Fred Opie's New Books

Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food



Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Food Research, Writing, and Publishing Since 2008

Rio Piedras, Food Market, Rio, Puerto Rico, 1942 (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
In this podcast Fred Opie answers questions from Wellesley College students about his evolution as a writer, thinker, and teacher. His responses provide useful advice on writing and research, publishing, book marketing, book tours, teaching, and more. [Listen Now 15min 37sec] http://fdopie.podomatic.com/entry/2015-05-21T07_40_50-07_00

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Market Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Markets

Fred Opie's New Books

Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food


Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Related Links
Food Writing Workshop Part 1: [Listen Now 1 hr 29 min 6 sec] https://soundcloud.com/chicago-amplified/food-writing-workshop-part-1

Food Writing Workshop Part 2: [Listen Now 1 hr 17 min 35 sec] https://soundcloud.com/chicago-amplified/food-writing-workshop-part-2

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

W. E. B. Dubois on Food in Rural Tennessee

Fisk University Students, 1899 (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Fried chicken, recipes below

W. E. B. Dubois (1868-1963) served as teacher in a country school in rural Tennessee back when he was a student at Fisk University; he graduated in 1888. “On Friday nights I often went home with some of the children [from the school]—sometimes to Doc Burke’s farm,” recalls Dubois. “In the tiny back kitchen I was often invited to ‘take out and help’ myself to fried chicken and wheat biscuits, ‘meat’ and corn pone, string-beans and berries.” Rural folk held the teacher and preacher in high regard which they demonstrated with the type of food they offered them. When you care about someone, you feed them your best even at the point of self-sacrifice. 

Fried Chicken Recipe:

“Cut the chicken up, separating every joint, and wash clean.  Salt and pepper it, and roll into flour well.  Have your fat very hot, and drop the pieces into it, and let them cook brown.  The chicken is done when the fork passes easily into it.  After the chicken is all cooked, leave a little of the hot fat in the skillet; then take a tablespoon of dry flour and brown it in the fat, stirring it around, then pour water in and stir till the gravy is as thin as soup.”
 Abby Fisher, What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking. (1881)


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Fried Chicken Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Fried+Chicken

Fred Opie's New Books

Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food


Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Vegan Fried Chicken Recipe [Watch Now]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=te6Cv7RTazU

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Foraging For Mushrooms

Mushroom sauce over steak and potato along with some greens, mushroom gravy recipes below 
To survive people have historically foraged in forest for edible berries, herbs, tubers, wild greens and mushrooms. Lately I’ve had a taste for a mushroom sauce. Here’s a southern one from Tennessee that serves about 3 to 5 people. This mushroom sauce works equally well over a barbecued steak, baked potato, or brown rice. There is link to a easy but sensational port-wine mushroom sauce that goes well with various meat and vegan meat substitutes.

Tennessee mushroom sauce recipe

Ingredients
½ cup butter or butter substitute divided
2 (8-ounce) containers of fresh mushrooms ( I like portabella, shiitake, and or what’s on sale)
3 tablespoons chopped fresh scallions or Vidalia onions
3 tablespoons whole wheat or white flour
1 teaspoon dry mustard
2 cups soy or regular milk
2 teaspoons hot sauce
¾ teaspoon sea salt
¾ teaspoon fresh ground pepper

Method

Melt 1/4 cup butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat; add mushrooms, and sauté 12 to 14 minutes or until liquid evaporates. Add onions and sauté for two minutes. Remove from heat. Melt remaining 1/4 cup butter in a large saucepan over medium heat; whisk in flour until smooth. Cook, whisking constantly, 1 minute; whisk in dry mustard. Gradually whisk in milk and next 3 ingredients; cook, whisking constantly, until mixture is thickened and bubbly. Stir in mushroom mixture, and cook until thoroughly heated.

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Foraging Stories & Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=foraging

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Port-wine Mushroom Sauce Recipe: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=223410

Monday, July 20, 2015

Gardens Vegetables and Herbs

A Chandler's Deli/soul food restaurant menu, East Knoxville, Tennessee 
When trying to figure out what vegetables you should plant check with your local county agent who can recommend thd best crops for your topography. Second take a look on the menu of a good restaurant like Chandler's in East Knoxville, Tennessee. There is a difference in the taste of a dish made with fresh grown produce. Some things you can grow others look for in your local farmers market. If you don’t have a farmer's market, help organize one with members of your community.

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Gardening Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Gardening

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com