Friday, March 27, 2015

Andean Brew Part 2

Like wine in the Christian communion, the Inca used chicha as part of their religious ceremonies. They also used it to pay laborers for state construction work on temples and for agricultural work. Employers also used chicha as payment for many other types of work and it served as the common currency that laborers happily accepted. But not all chicha tasted the same. Elites with access to higher quality ingredients and brewing techniques paid laborers with a better tasting chicha. In the final analysis chicha remained essential to the smooth operation of Andean society serving as sanitary beverage, source of nutrition, an aid to worship, and a currency of exchange for labor.


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Andean Foodways and Beverages: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Andean

Native American Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Native+American+Foodways

Corn Series with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=corn+series

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season


Fred Opie's New Books
    Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Andean Brew Part 1

Chicha (Photo courtesy of http://songoftheopenroads.blogspot.com/
In the Andes people have historically consumed a brewed beverage known as chicha; a 1-12% alcoholic beverage made from fermented corn. The drink was vital to the daily life in the Andean region.  A high demand existed for chicha because it tasted good and proved much cleanlier and healthier than most water supplies. Most used it as a daily beverage to compliment the food they served or drank it alone for it nutritional value. Men and women and children 14 or over commonly drank three cups of chicha every day. Chicha came in different varieties depending on one’s brewing technique, choice of corn, aging, and flavor additives. For instance we know that some added berries, sugar, and or, lemon to their chicha brew.  


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Andean Foodways and Beverages: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Andean

Native American Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Native+American+Foodways

Corn Series with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=corn+series

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season


Fred Opie's New Books
    Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

American Recipes Before 1492, Part 2 Corn


Gilled Corn
Today let's talk recipes and cooking with the second of the gastronomical trinity of Native Americans—maize or corn. It is from the Arawak, one of three Amerindian groups to inhabit the Caribbean, that the word mahiz comes from which the Spanish derived the term maize for corn.  Corn represented the staple grain that Amerindians across the continent cultivated and cooked. They used it in a variety of ways including eating it fresh, parched, boiled, baked, steamed, roasted or grilled. They made corn breads, popped corn, puddings, dumplings, porridges, stews, and drinks--some of them alcoholic and some nonalcoholic, ground it to make masa for tortillas.  

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Corn Series with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=corn+series

Native American Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Native+American+Foodways

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Interview with a Masa Maker: [Listen Now] http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/gf/gf140503wine_fraud_what_to_d

Fred Opie's New Book on Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food
Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Mole, Three Continents in One Sauce

Mole-Plobano served over chicken with Spanish rice and fried plantains, this and other mole recipes below (photo from http://casitamex.com/) Click to enlarge.
Mole, is a quintessential fusion Mexican dish with elements from the Americas, Asia, and Africa. The term mole comes from the Nahua word mblli, which mean sauce. Indigenous people had been cooking and preparing drinks with cacao and peppers for many years in consumed in ceramic vessels and over time they developed mole. In fact Aztec oligarchs received cacao as tribute form the groups who they conquered and cultivated it as part of their subsistence crops. The labor intensive rich spicy chocolate sauce most often contains spices native to Asia such as cloves, cinnamon, and pepper along with other ingredients. Mexican cooks most often serve mole dishes garnished with sesame seeds which are indigenous to Africa. The seeds arrived in Mexico via the Colombian Exchange and Atlantic slave trade.  Iberians imported large numbers of Africans to during the colonial period to work in the mining industry and sugar plantations. 


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Mexican Foodways and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Mexico

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Moles Recipes: http://allrecipes.com/recipes/world-cuisine/latin-america/mexico/mole-recipes/ViewAll.aspx

Vegan Mole Recipe: http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=8746.0

Fred Opie's New Book on Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food
Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Monday, March 23, 2015

American Recipes Before 1492, Part 1 Beans

Black bean salad, this and other recipes below 
Before 1492 Americans had a gastronomical trinity that included beans, corn, and squash. They ate beans in a number of ways such as soaking and then baking or boiling them in clay pots. They also parched or toasted beans to make it easier to grind them into a powder or flour used for fast bean dishes. We know for examples Mesoamericans smashed boiled beans and then refried them. They also added corn dough to boiled beans as a thickener also eating them with corn tortillas.  Serving tortillas with beans had a nutritional and practical benefit because one could easily pick up the beans with the tortillas. Tortillas and beans and beans and toasted squash seeds accompanied with onion and chilies greens represented a common combination in the Mayan and Aztec world that bordered each other. 

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Rice and Beans/Rice and Peas Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=rice+and+beans

Mexican Foodways and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Mexico

Guatemala Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Guatemala+

Native American Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Native+American+Foodways

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Black Bean Salad Recipe: http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/black_bean_salad/

Fred Opie's New Book on Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food
Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Friday, March 20, 2015

This Weeks Best Podcast, Prisoners and Food

Editor Fred Opie shares his favorite mp3 downloads this week on the prisoners and food
From the BBC Food Program, Award Winning Prison Restaurant: [Listen Now 28min] http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio4/foodprog/foodprog_20150222-1300a.mp3

Cooking In a New York Prison: [Listen Now 20 min 19 sec] http://blogs.kcrw.com/goodfood/2014/07/cooking-in-prison/


Broncos, Boudin, and Angola Prison: [Listen Now 7 min 15 sec] http://www.npr.org/2008/04/17/89698695/broncos-and-boudin-the-angola-prison-rodeo

Learning to Make Candy Behind Bars: [Listen Now 7 min 15 sec] http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4989099


Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Fred Opie's New Books
     NYC Protest History: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/978023114940

Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Going Nuts Part 4, South Carolina

Selling Peanuts in 1910 (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Street Venders Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Street+Venders

Peanut Stories with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=peanuts

Fred Opie's New Books
     NYC Protest History: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/978023114940

Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Going Nuts Part 3, Baltimore


Roasted Konstant Peanut Vender in front of the Lexington Market in Baltimore, Maryland 
During the Atlantic slave trade the Portuguese introduced peanuts to Africa where they used them as part of the rations used on slave ships. African farmers began planting them in their fields and selling them to those seeking food for the Atlantic slave trade. In Africa and the Americas peanuts became something of a candy that people regularly snacked on, that became the case in the south where people boiled them with salt and roasted them.  One 1904 account describes an elderly African American man in south who sold cups of roasted peanuts for five cents each out of large basket as a street vender. In addition to becoming a street vender’s food, peanuts became a popular snack sold in stadiums.

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Maryland Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Maryland+Foodways

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Street Venders Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Street+Venders

Peanut Stories with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=peanuts

Fred Opie's New Books
     NYC Protest History: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/978023114940

Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Going Nuts Part 2 Brazilian Carurú

Carurú, recipe below
In writing the book Hog and Hominy I read travel accounts to learn about cookery throughout the Atlantic world. For example, travel accounts of Bahia, Brazil in the nineteenth century documents the food of this sugar producing region. Street vendors there made and sold a wonderful-smelling gumbo they called Carurú. This Bahian gumbo contains: toasted peanuts, shrimp grated coconut; chopped collard greens, onions, pepper, and okra; palm oil/ dendê oil and herbs all boiled to perfection in a large pot.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Street Venders Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Street+Venders

Peanut Stories with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=peanuts

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season


Hog and Hominy: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/978-0-231-14638-8/hog-and-hominy


Fred Opie's New Books

     NYC Protest History: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/978023114940

Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/


Traditional Carurú Recipe

Monday, March 16, 2015

Going Nuts Part 1 Polk County, Florida

Peanut Patch circa 1900 (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Peanuts are indigenous to Brazil. Like corn, the Portuguese introduced them to West and Central Africa in the fifteenth century. Later, the Portuguese used them as rations on slave ships.  Seeing an economic opportunity, African farmers began planting them in their fields and selling them to those provisioning ships for long journeys. In Africa and the Americas, peanuts became something of a candy that people regularly snacked on.  Zora Neale Hurston found “hot peanuts” among the list of treats a man could buy for a woman. Peanuts show up in the lyrics of a song sung by Ella Wall, whom Hurston calls, “the Queen of love in the jooks (juke joints) of Polk County, Florida.” In one of her songs, Wall says, give me “more dancing, drinks, peanuts, [and] singing….”On paydays in a sawmill camp of the Everglades Cypress Lumber Company in Loughman, Florida, Hurston found “parched [roasted] peanuts” as part of the refreshments laborers served at a Saturday outdoor fireside dance. For centuries cooks across the globe have used peanuts in various recipes.

Greens in Peanut Sauce Recipe

Ingredients
1 or 2 pounds (or more): cleaned de-stemmed and shredded cassava, collards, kale, or turnip greens
1 chopped tomato
1 finely chopped onion
½ cup peanut butter (or peanuts)
Sea salt black pepper
Cayenne pepper or red pepper if you like spicy food

Method
In a large pot bring two cups of water to a boil. Add greens. Cover and cook on high heat for ten minutes, stirring often. Reduce heat. Remove most of the liquid from the pot and save half of it. Add tomatoes and onion to the greens, stir and simmer for ten minutes or more. In a bowl combine the peanut butter with enough of the liquid from the cooking pot to allow it to be mixed until smooth. Add peanut butter mixture to greens. Season to your own taste with the spices and simmer on very low heat until greens are tender.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Women’s History Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=women%27s+history

Lenten Season Series with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Lenten+Season

Fred Opie's New Books
     NYC Protest History: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/978023114940

Fred Opie’s March Zora Neale Hurston and Florida Food Book Event in Metro Boston https://www.facebook.com/events/1419460845021545/