Monday, May 25, 2015

Army Veteran Reflects on Eating MREs

Lemon Pound Cake, links to this and other recipes below (image from babyelandaily.com)

Let take a look at Memorial Day through the lens of an army vet who reflects on eating Meals Ready To Eat (MREs) in the field.

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Pound Cake Story with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/2011/01/martin-luther-king-jr-series-part-4.html

Civil War Stories with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=civil+war

Camp Food Series: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Camping+Series

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

The History Channel’s Meals Ready to Eat (MRE): [Watch 4 min 26 sec] http://www.history.com/videos/battlefield-meals-ready-to-eat#battlefield-meals-ready-to-eat

Friday, May 22, 2015

Fish Friday,1820 Charleston, South Carolina

Woman fishing from a wharf (Courtesy of the State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: 
[Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Adam Hodgson’s 19th Century Travel and Account and Food: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Adam+Hodgson

Thursday, May 21, 2015

The Crust Food Series, Kibbeh

Kibbeh balls made with pine nuts, recipe below 
Some have traced the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to the consumption of bush meat (wild game) in this instance bats which in some regions people consider them a delicacy - they are must lager than the typical bat in other parts of the world. In this series we provide historical context to the people and regions inundated with the Ebola scourge many of which are Mande. Mande speakers (also identified in historical documents as Mandingo and Mandinka) lived in the geographic area of present-day Liberia. The Mande made a dish called kibbeh which is a ball or torpedo-shaped fried croquette stuffed with minced lamb. “So delicious did I find it,” writes traveler Theodore Canot in the 1800s, “that, even at this distance of time, my mouth waters when I remember the forced meat balls of mutton, minced with roasted ground nuts, that I devoured that night in the Mandingo town of Kya.” 

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Africa in Culinary Context Series & Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Africa+in+Culinary+Context+

West African Foodways and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=West+Africa

Traditional Kibbeh Ball Recipe: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18558097

Vegan Kibbeh Ball Recipe:
http://www.messyvegetariancook.com/2009/01/13/baked-tempeh-kibbeh/

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

The Crust Food Series, The Knish


Knish, recipes below (image from horinca.blogspot.com 

I started watching hockey games in the 1970s during the height of Boston Bruin Hall of Famer Bobby Orr’s playing career (1966 to 1978). Orr sparked my short lived hockey career which led to many hours and food eaten in hockey rinks in and around Metropolitan New York. Most of the hockey rinks I frequented catered to the culinary taste of the region: burgers, hot dogs, fries, large pretzels (served with coarse salt and eaten with mustard), and knishes. Introduced to New York by Jewish immigrants at the turn-of-the-century, a knish is a seasoned potato puree inside a golden colored crust.  Like Caribbean patties, and Latin American empanadas, knishes are a great carryout food. Today I have a very eclectic palate much of it shaped during my hockey playing days and time spent living in different parts of Latin America. 

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Jamaican Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Jamaica


Empanada History with Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=empanada


Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402
     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

The Crust Food Series, Jamaican Patties

The classic Jamaican Patty 
One day when I was in high school hunting down something to eat after a haircut. I went into this Jamaican bodega and smelt something delectable. I quickly learned to identify the smell of freshly baked Jamaican patties—chicken, beef, vegetable, and in some take out joints even more varieties. If you’ve never had a patty I can only say you poor deprived person. Patties are spicy meat or vegetable filled delights with in both a crispy and flaky golden crust.  The store in Ossining sold them piping hot—in fact many such stores have a warning sign posted near the class display that reads, “Caution hot patties fresh out the oven.” What's your favorite mom and pop store food memory?

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Jamaican Food History and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Jamaica

Ossining Food History and Recipeshttp://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Ossining

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Monday, May 18, 2015

The Crust Food Series, Empanadas

When I became old enough to swing a mob, vacuum, and operate a floor buffing machine, I joined the family business. I spent lots of early weekend mornings cleaning offices like Frank’s Fuel in North Tarrytown, New York. Frank’s had been located on the side of the town where migrants and immigrants from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic lived. After completing my work, my dad gave breakfast money to keep me from complaining about getting pulled out of bed to work before 7 am.  One day, I found a corner bodega up the street from Franks and near the entrance to the GM plant. The bodega had would looked like to me at the time Jamaican patties but smaller. These had delicious fruit fillings such as pineapple, apple, and my favorite, Guava. I learned the were called empanadas.  I’d buy a couple of empanadas, a bag of sweet plantain chips, and a carton of orange juice. With that in my stomach, I’d make it through the second half of cleaning Frank’s Fuel.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Tarrytown Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Tarrytown


Empanada Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=empanada+

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Guava Empanada Recipe: http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=656455

NYC Bodegas As A Urban Food Space/Culture: [Listen Now 57 min 34 sec] https://soundcloud.com/latinousa/1508-a-day-in-the-bodega

Friday, May 15, 2015

Rivers Through the Lens of Food, The Mississippi

New Orleans Catfish Po-Boy Sandwich and Fries
The history of the iconic New Orlean's po-boy sandwich is controversial with many interpretations in the crescent city's folklore. Most date the origins of the term po-boy to a 1929 street car workers strike and the sandwich that the Martin Brothers Restaurant (former street car workers) created to feed and support the members of their former union as they struggled for collective bargaining rights from city officials.

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New Orleans History with Related Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=New+Orleans

Rivers Through the Lens of Food Series: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=River

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: 
[Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Back Story's History of the Mississippi River [Listen Now 52 min and 1 sec]: http://backstoryradio.org/shows/that-lawless-stream/

Thursday, May 14, 2015

An Ice Cream that Drove Ben and Jerry's Nuts

Ben and Jerry’s Rainforest Crunch Ice Cream (Photo from http://www.visualphotos.com/)

I attended Syracuse University as an undergrad and graduate student. But it was not until grad school that one day between 1992 and 1995 I stopped at a gas station off of route17 to fill up on fuel and food.  That’s when I found it—Ben & Jerry’s Rainforest Crunch Ice Cream!  It had vanilla ice cream with chunks of cashew and Brazil nut in a buttery caramel crunch mixture.  Ben & Jerry's began producing the favor in 1989 and marketed it as eco-friendly product. The sale pitch on the container insisted that the company sourced the nuts from cooperatives in their native Brazil and the revenue helped poor rainforest people earn a living, reduced the practice of clear-cutting the rainforests, and promoted sustainability. Rainforest Crunch quickly became a best seller for Ben & Jerry’s and that off the beaten path gas station between Elmira and Binghamton became a regular pit stop. Ben & Jerry’s discontinued the product when the news broke that the eco-friendly part of the equation proved false as the company began to source the ingredients from agro-exporters in Brazil instead of cooperatives. In 1995 my favorite ice cream disappeared from my route 17 freezer as the Vermont based company discontinued it as part of its damage control measures to protect its eco-friendly image.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie


Syracuse University Food Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Syracuse+University

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: 
[Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Boston Globe article on the Rainforest Crunch scandal:  http://www.jonentine.com/articles/boston_globe.htm

Ben and Jerry and Brazil: http://www1.american.edu/ted/ben.htm

Folks are still talking about Rainforest Crunch: http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=10461186460&topic=4589

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

What is Soul Food?

Black Cooks serving customers at the Jungle Gardens in Vero Beach, Florida, circa 1940 (Courtesy of the State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory) 
The Following is a prerecorded interview from 2010. The Splendid Table Host Lynne Rossetto Kasper talks with Food Prof Fred Opie about soul food.  [Listen Now 7 min 14 sec] http://fdopie.podomatic.com/entry/2014-11-21T07_58_26-08_00


Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Soul Food Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=soul+food

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402
     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Soul Food and Baltimore's Yellow Bowl

Items once sold at the now defunct Yellow Bowl in Baltimore, Maryland 
During the 1960s and 1970s CORE and the Black Panthers launched organizing efforts in Baltimore that led to an increased black consciousness. Soul food in the 1960s and 1970s became associated with African-American culture and ethnicity. People with soul had a down-home style that migrants from the rural South like the owners of the Yellow Bowl, the Fullards, could unite around. In terms of food that meant southern dishes like scrapple sandwiches, grits, candied yams, corn bread, collard greens, biscuits and gravy and fried and smothered chicken. 


Smothered Chicken Recipe
Ingredients
1 young chicken
1/8 pound butter
1 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups hot water
3 tablespoons flour
3 tablespoons butter

Directions
Open young chicken down the back, and clean as usual. The chicken is laid flat in a baking dish with the skin down. Into the hollows put 1/8 pound of butter, a teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar and 1 teaspoon salt. Into the pan put two cups of hot water.  Be careful to keep the water up to that amount during the cooking. Set in a moderate oven and baste from time to time with liquid in the pan. After thirty minutes turn the chicken over, dredge with flour and put on cover. Baste frequently. Cook until tender. Mix together equal parts butter and flour. To this one-half cup liquid from the pan. When well mixed, return all to the pan and stir till [sic] the gravy is thickened. Be careful to get plenty of salt to taste. A little white pepper may be desired.
The Baltimore Sunday, October 19, 1930

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/FrederickDouglassOpie?ref=hl and Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/DrFredDOpie

Baltimore Food History and Recipes: 
http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=Baltimore+Foodways 

Soul Food Stories and Recipes: http://www.foodasalens.com/search?q=soul+food

Fred Opie's New Books
     Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/upsetting-the-apple-cart/9780231149402

     Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food

Listen to The Breaking Bread Podcast: [Listen Now] http://fdopie.podomatic.com

WGBH's Basic Black's Soul Food Panel Discussion: [Watch Now 26 min 45 sec] http://www.wgbh.org/basicBlack/index.cfm